Rock Your Life: Embrace Your Inner Child

The other day I created this post on Facebook. “You are an adult to your inner child. Give yourself permission to eat ice cream for breakfast… in your cowgirl boots.”  Judging by the likes and comments, this little ditty delighted a number of friends. Like me, they probably sometimes tire of being an adult. Not only is it hard work, as grown-ups, we sometimes lack the creativity and spontaneity of the young.

little girl with ice cream in studio isolated

Are you too wound up in the parameters of adulthood? I know I am much of the time. When I need to step back, turn off the noise of the world and shake off my Ms Manners persona, I turn to my old friend Dr. Suess. I think he nailed it when he said “I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain.”

crazy monster

I’ve always cherished reading to children and delivering the sing-song verses written by Theodore Geisel, (AKA Dr. Suess) the man dubbed as the modern Mother Goose. We love his characters because they embrace coloring outside the lines. Rarely do they play by the rules. (Actually, Theodore was prone to breaking the rules too as evidenced by some trouble he got into at Dartmouth. Along with some buddies, he was caught drinking in his dorm room.) I know, no big deal right? Well this was 1924 when prohibition reigned so there was a penalty.

Embracing our inner child means sometimes looking at the world wearing glasses two prescriptions too strong.

Funny nerdy school boy in classroom

Perhaps Suess was doing this when he wrote: “From here to there, and there to here, funny things are everywhere.”

 

So jump on the bandwagon today and plan something fun. Break out of the constant mold of proper adult behavior. Head to the mall and buy some light-up shoes to wear to work on casual Friday. Hide a bottle of soap bubbles in your desk drawer and blow them over your cube when the boss isn’t looking. Get creative and mix it up a bit. As Suess reminded us, “There is fun to be done! There are points to be scored. There are games to be won.”

About breakfast…forget your morning Starbucks ritual of a non-fat decaf cappuccino or your skinny green tea latte. Stop at the nearest Ben and Jerry’s and opt for a scoop of one of their insane flavors like Pumpkin Cheesecake. As for me, I just might show up at the breakfast table wearing a pink tutu

Ballerina in pink tutu leaning forward

and munching on cold pizza my favorite wacky breakfast treat.

 

 

Finding Solitude During the Holidays

Cap 1

It occurred to me as I sat quietly sipping my cappuccino that lately I have been plugging a considerable amount of activities into my smart phone calendar. Today I took a closer look at the events over the next eight weeks and sighed. A little voice down deep warned me I would soon be bordering on over commitment. Thankful for that inner wisdom I decided to be more mindful regarding my schedule.

As we move into a celebratory season filled with friends, fun and a host of parties and get-togethers, it is easy to obliterate the white space from our calendars. Although the warmth and comfort of gathering together in thankfulness and love is what makes this the best time of the year, we pay a price when removing our much needed solitude.

Holiday Plate

Meaningful alone time is required to balance the hectic pace of our lives which increases during the holidays. According to psychologist, Ester Buchholz, “Being alone gives us the power to regulate and adjust our lives. It can teach us fortitude and the ability to satisfy our own needs.”

During my teens and early twenties I constantly craved being with friends and family, always active, always on the run to the next activity. I clearly recall one day being hungry and without a lunch date, which meant eating alone. I found going into a restaurant on my own both an enlightening and scary experience.  Looking back I realized it was really one of my growth moments because I discovered being alone was not lonely, it was necessary. Psychologists tout that time spent alone signals emotional maturity, so I had finally arrived. I discovered Henry David Thoreau was right when he said: “I never found a companion that was so companionable as solitude.”

Being in your own company provides the power of perspective. It enables you to analyze your priorities, your future goals and where you’re going in life.

enlightenment, silhouette of woman practicing yoga on the beach

But let me be clear, solitude does not mean sitting at your laptop alone interacting on Facebook or browsing on your smart phone. To embrace solitude, you must be alone with only your thoughts to guide you. Unplug from the world and just be. If you’ve forgotten how to enjoy being on your own, just observe a child alone at play. Children are totally content to take pleasure in a world they create. They delight in their own company.

So this season, do justice to your schedule. Limit the number of gatherings you attend.

Plates and Candles

Gracefully excuse yourself by acknowledging the generosity of an invitation but follow up by saying you are sorry you cannot be present as you have something else planned during that time. It is not untrue. You do have another pressing engagement, a quiet slot on your calendar. Enjoy the alone time and use it to be thankful for your many blessings.