It’s The Little Things

    For weeks I prepared for a very big move. I traded in life in the Golden State for my next chapter in the Sunshine State. If you’ve ever moved across the country, or across the street, you know when it comes to your personal belongings, there are many decisions to be made.

For me, the big stuff was a cake walk. Selling my furniture, giving away clothing, kitchen ware and electronics, all a no-brainer. It’s the little things that gave me pause. Articles like a mug, a shawl, a tray, a Christmas ornament, a selection of amazing spices,  all gifted to me by friends that I did not leave behind.

     That’s the way it is in life, right? The small items or happenings make your heart sing and bring you joy. A mother’s smile, a first kiss, the smell of coffee brewing in the morning, your fourth grader’s first home run, the list is infinite. It may have been Pooh who said, “Sometimes the smallest things take up the most room in your heart.” Well said dear Pooh. And for all of life’s little things, we should express gratitude.

For the small things that bring me joy, I am grateful

      We can also view this “little thing” concept from a goal achievement perspective. Obviously scoring small wins count when working toward the big goal. As Van Gogh stated, “Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.” He certainly proved it with each tiny little brushstroke. 

Something Small Goes BIG

Sometimes something small inadvertently turns into a big accomplishment. I once read that Dale Carnegie’s mega-best-seller, “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” started with a short speech that expanded to a workshop, soon after became a course and eventually, the book. According to Wikipedia, over 15 million copies of this book have been sold worldwide.

So maybe the life lesson here is dream big, but start small.

Stop for a moment and consider the possibility of something you started as a minor project. Is there promise is broadening the outcome? (Note to self: Listen to your own advice. Turn your career columns and motivational blogs into two separate books. )     

Two Take-Aways

Based on the experience, my advice is twofold. Take notice of, and delight in the small things.  Show appreciation to the guy who let you cut into traffic, the barista who made you the perfect Tall Flat White and the sound of your loved one’s laughter. At the same time, review your catalog of small projects and determine if you’ve created a diamond in the rough. The possibilities are limitless!!

Dear Readers,

My husband and I have now been in our South Palm Beach condo for a month. Our transition has been an amazing experience. Takes a bit of moxie to step out in faith, but well worth it.

Now that we are settled in, I am returning to blogging on a regular basis. Thank you for reading and I hope you will continue to subscribe to “Life on the Sunny Side.”

Love,

Sunny

A Lesson In Gratitude

My 88-year-old mother has been a positive, loving, stable, supportive, and giving influence throughout my life.

Money was scarce, but I never felt poor. We lived in a small home in a little steel mill town. Although we struggled, I never heard my parents discuss money concerns.   Nor did I know  they searched the couch for dimes that may have fallen out of dad’s pocket to pay for his bus rides to work.  Never missed having a car.  Always felt loved, and secure.

But I never really realized how important that security was, until a few days ago. The backstory is three years ago, when my mother’s dementia became apparent, I moved her to Florida to be near me.  My father, who was her prince, and our hero, passed two years prior.

This week something happened. Mom told me she was scared.  She asked to  go “home.” When I inquired who she wanted to see at home, she said her mother.  More of the backstory, both parents were deceased by the time she was three  years old, and her sister, age 14, successfully raised my mom and her four siblings.

Have you ever watched your mother cry and say she was scared?  This was my first experience seeing mom genuinely afraid.  It devastated me.  It made me cry.

But, this blog is not about my mother’s experience or how well (or at times not) I deal with her pain. My message is I am a very lucky person. The question is why, and I hope this simple little story is a life lesson.

Lucky, you might think?  Dealing with a mother who has dementia?The answer is yes I am a lucky girl. While reflecting on what mom is going through, I realized my parents provided immense security. I never knew about the financial pressure of making ends meet. There was never a time I felt I could not go to my parents. They were always there for me. Although I have always been grateful, I know I have truly been blessed. 

 

Even after my dad passed, as hard as that was, I felt comforted by the very thought of him. Maybe that sounds a bit crazy but you see, he took great care of mom.  They watched over each other.  Daily I pray he looks down on me, and guides me to make the right decisions for mom.

Today I read a beautiful post written by a young friend of mine, Aimee Tarte, Owner of Lady And The Mug, in Coral Springs, Florida. She wrote:

No matter what happens in my life, I am at peace because I understand how blessed I am and for that, I’m eternally grateful. Let’s not just be thankful today, but change our mindsets to appreciate the smallest of things we overlook. I’ll always be an optimist and believe in everyone, especially those who have done wrong against me. Serve others, give with a pure heart, and remember how short life is”

 

That says it all, now doesn’t it?

Take a few moments to STOP and think about your life. What lessons of gratitude can you find that never occurred to you? Think of one small of thing you previously overlooked and post below. I would love your feedback.  It could inspire all of us!

A note from Sunny. This blog was written by my dear forever friend, Irma Parone of Parone Group.

She can be reached at irma@paronegroup.com  www.paronegroup.com

Also please free to also leave comments on this post.